Tag Archives: Alfred Hitchcock

2019 Cookery Project — Easter Lunch

Easter Lunch

Easter Lunch

A full plate. It’s a holiday!

Clockwise from the top, we have rosemary roasted onions, made with garlic, lemon juice, Dijon mustard, and rosemary, then sliced leg of lamb, with more garlic and more rosemary. There’s a dab of store-bought mint jelly at six o’clock.

The star of the show was the serving of Brussels sprouts with onion and crumbled bacon.

Rating

★ Disaster. Inedible. Poisoned the cat.
★★ OK, but once is enough.
★★★ Mixed results. Something went wrong, but might try this again.
★★★★ Good, but lacks that special something. for the onions.
★★★★★ Excellent. Goes into my “This is a winner” file. for the Brussels sprouts.


Lamb to the Slaughter

This seems an appropriate place for a certain memorable video.

From 1955 through 1962, Alfred Hitchcock hosted a television anthology series called Alfred Hitchcock Presents. Hitchcock only directed 17 of the 268 episodes—in those days, a television season could run to 40 weekly episodes—but he hosted all of them, displaying the famous Hitchcock dark humour during his introduction and closing comments to each show, and mildly trolling his advertisers before the mid-show commercials. His appearances were sometimes the best part of the episodes.

Here’s one of the classic Alfred Hitchcock Presents stories, written by Roald Dahl, starring an absolutely-perfect-in-the-part Barbara Bel Geddes, and directed by A. Hitchcock himself. It’s called Lamb to the Slaughter.

Lady Macbeth Trailer

First of all, no, it’s not the Scottish play, the name of which must never be mentioned.

This Lady Macbeth is an adaptation of Nikolai Leskov’s 1865 novel, Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District. It finally opened in five US theatres this weekend, after making the rounds on the festival circuit and getting rave reviews in the UK. The Tomatometer has it at 89%.

The movie has gotten high praise, especially for what’s been called “an amazing performance” by Florence Pugh, who plays Katherine. At 21, it’s only her second feature film.

What first drew my attention to Lady Macbeth was the subheading for Eric Kohn’s IndieWire review: “Imagine Alfred Hitchcock directing Wuthering Heights and you’ll get an idea of William Oldroyd’s tense period drama.” Pretty irresistible.

More theatres will be added in the weeks to come.