Category Archives: Music

“Do You Remember the 21st Night of September?”

If you do, you’ve been around for quite a while.

Earth, Wind & Fire’s “September” was released in 1978, 40 years ago.

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The Struts — “Body Talks”, featuring Kesha

Glam Rock Lives!

What a great song! Watching this new version of The Struts’ “Body Talks”, featuring Kesha, never fails to make me smile.

The shaggy-haired, skinny, androgynous lead singer for The Struts is Luke Spiller, who has been described as “the musical love child of Freddie Mercury and Mick Jagger”.

Kesha is…Kesha.

In the past four years, The Struts have opened shows for The Rolling Stones, The Who, and Guns N’ Roses, quite a collection of Rock Gods (or Rock Dinosaurs, depending on your musical preferences).

The band has just started a three-month, 45-city US tour, with many of those 45(!) shows already sold out.


Here’s the colourful video for the original version of “Body Talks”:

“Five Years, That’s All We’ve Got”

Well, that was fast…

I started posting these notes five years ago today, and 1,645 postings later, I’m still at it. Today I took a look at some of the items I ran during my first few weeks online.

Some Things Haven’t Changed


Music Videos

Here’s the first video I ever posted: “70 Million”, by the Paris-based, Franco-American band Hold Your Horses.

It was complemented by another video about the inspirations for the images in the “70 Million” video. Try playing them simultaneously.

Still posting music, and still love this one.


Saying Goodbye to Breaking Bad

Was it really five years ago? For me, Breaking Bad was the Greatest Series Ever, and I still post about it at the drop of a pork pie hat.

No change; still obsessed.


Anglophilia

Rule Britania.

Dorothy Parker said she hated to talk to people from the UK, because they made her feel like she should be carrying a papoose on her back. I, on the other hand, am a pushover for anything said in one of the 684 recognized British accents.

And I love British comedy. Here’s Chris Turner, performing at The Glee Club, Cardiff:

Still a passionate Anglophile, still posting a disproportionate number of entries about the UK, even though Britain’s future looks grim, because of the self-inflicted damage resulting from Brexit. But then, it’s probably inappropriate for an American to criticize Brexit, since that was only the second most idiotic electoral result of 2016.


Restaurant Week

Summer Restaurant Week 2013 was what gave me the incentive to start blogging, and gave me the material I needed to get through the first few weeks.

Still at it. Posting Summer Restaurant Week 2018 pictures over the next two weeks.

 Some Things Have Changed, Thank God


On the left, the first Home Cooking picture I ever posted, long before my self-improvement Cookery Project started in 2016. On the right, the most recent Home Cooking picture

2013’s Poached Halibut and Asparagus with Basil-Tarragon Sauce vs 2018’s Cajun Chicken and Rice

I remember being so proud of the halibut, because I’d never poached fish before that.

I think my skill set and style have improved since then.


Much more to come in the next five years!

“A Lady Thinks She’s 60”

I probably don’t have to remind anyone that today is Madonna’s 60th birthday, since I assume most people spent the day celebrating.

“It’s a celebration
‘Cause anybody just won’t do
Let’s get this started
No more hesitation
‘Cause everybody wants to party with you.”

But now that the candles have been blown out and the birthday cake has been reduced to crumbs, here’s one last thing to commemorate the event.

Back in the early 90s, Madonna released a film called Madonna: Truth or Dare, a behind-the-scenes documentary about her most recent tour. Never one to leave well enough alone, the brilliant Julie Brown satirized it with a one-hour Showtime film called Medusa: Dare to Be Truthful, with Brown herself as Medusa, a dead-on parody of Madonna herself.

After it ran on Showtime, a VHS version the show was available but soon went out of print. The only place to find a DVD copy is on Julie Brown’s website.

But there’s always YouTube.

Someone has posted a murky copy of that VHS version, divided into six parts. It was probably posted back in the days when YouTube had time limits on videos.

Here’s the first segment. The other five parts are on the sidebar that shows up when you play it.


Credit Due: I was never a big Madonna fan. I would probably have been unaware of Madonna’s birthday if I hadn’t seen a reference on Kenneth Walsh’s great blog.

Head over Heals — The Go-Go’s Meet the Elizabethan Age

Like most people, whenever I hear the music of the 80s band The Go-Go’s, I ask myself why nobody has used those songs as the score for an updated version of Sir Philip Sidney’s 16th-century Middle English book, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia.

Head over Heals, which does exactly that, has opened on Broadway.

Although he’s largely forgotten now, Sidney played a huge role in the public life of the Elizabeth Age. He was elected to Parliament at the age of 18, and later became the son-in-law of Sir Francis Walsingham, Queen Elizabeth’s spymaster. A contemporary of Shakespeare, who “borrowed” part of Arcadia and used it as a subplot in King Lear,* Sidney was a writer, a diplomat, a courtier, and a soldier. His life was as varied and exciting as that of the great 19th-century adventurer, Sir Richard Burton.

Head over Heals celebrates some of the recurring dramatic/comedic devices of Elizabethan theatre. The show includes big helpings of cross-dressing and gender fluidity,  so common on 16th-century stages and so timely five centuries later. Everything old is new again.

And of course, plots that feature mistaken identities never go out of style.


Damn, They Were Good!

Here’s the original 1984 Go-Go’s video for “Head over Heals”:

The 80s might have been the Golden Age of alternative/indie/powerpop/whatever music. For haircuts, not so much. I think that hairstyles almost always go out of fashion after 10 or 15 years, and look silly and embarrassing until a few decades later, at which point, they’re appreciated as classic.

Three and a half minutes of The Go-Go’s is simply not enough. Here’s the video for my favourite Go-Go’s song:


*Shakespeare did that sort of thing much too frequently.

“It’s not plagiarism, it’s an homage”, Shakespeare never said, but he should have.

“Andy Warhol’s Dead But I’m Not”

Andy Warhol, born 6 August 1928, would have been 90 years old today.


I thought about posting some of Warhol’s prints, since his popularization of Pop Art changed the way people have thought about art ever since…

…and I considered posting a couple of songs from the Warhol-produced “Velvet Underground & Nico” album, one of the greatest and most influential recordings in modern history…

Note the $2 admission charge ($1 with student ID) for this performance at the University of Denver Student Union.

…and how could I overlook Warhol’s long reign as celebrity-in-chief during the sex-and-drugs-drenched Golden Age of Studio 54?


But in the end, I decided that this song from the 80s was a fine tribute to one of the 20th century’s great innovators.

David Bowie is Almost Over

After a phenomenally successful five-year, five-continent, 11-city  tour, the Victoria & Albert Museum’s David Bowie is exhibition is coming to an end. The show, now at the Brooklyn Museum, closes on Sunday, 15 July 2018. There are still tickets available, but the remaining weekends are heavily booked.

Unless you already have a ticket, you won’t be able to get in tomorrow, 20 June 2018, because it’s a very special day.

Here’s a little background to explain why:

According to Billboard, “…when the exhibit first premiered at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum in March 2013, expectations were low. ‘No other museum had booked it for the tour,’ co-creator Victoria Broackes confessed, ‘and we’d published 10,000 copies of the catalog. There wasn’t a lot of optimism that it was going to be a rip-roaring success.'”

“Rip-roaring success” is an understatement, as David Bowie Is became the V&A’s fastest selling show. More than a year ago, it became the most visited exhibition in the V&A’s 166-year history.

And tomorrow, it will welcome its two-millionth visitor.


To celebrate, someone will be designated as Visitor #2,000,000 and will receive a signed lithograph of a Bowie self-portrait, a limited edition of the David Bowie Is book, a pair of Sennheiser headphones, and a premium subscription to Spotify.

With more than 180,000 visitors,  David Bowie is is the best-selling exhibition in the Brooklyn Museum’s history,

Look. This is a flat-out amazing exhibition. If you have a chance to see it, GO. You won’t regret it. If you skip it, on the other hand, you’ll never forgive yourself. Those 2,000,000 people are going to be talking about this show for the rest of their lives, and when they find out you didn’t see it, they’ll be relentless in their ridicule and scorn.

This is one party you shouldn’t miss.


If you’re unfamiliar with New York, it might be helpful to know that the Brooklyn Museum is a 45-minute subway ride from Times Square. It’s a straight shot, no transfers trip on the 2 and 3 lines, and the Brooklyn exit is at the Museum’s entrance.

Here’s a “Know Before You Go” video from the Museum.


All photographs in this posting came from the New York Times online.