Daily Archives: 3 April 2019

The Dead Don’t Die — First Trailer

So, is the slogan correct? Does The Dead Don’t Die really have “The Greatest Zombie Cast Ever Disassembled”?

It may well be. Look who’s in it:

Chloë Sevigny, Adam Driver, Tilda Swinton, Steve Buscemi, Selena Gomez, Bill Murray, Austin Butler, Tom Waits, Caleb Landry Jones, Carol Kane, Danny Glover, Rosie Perez, and Iggy Pop. Tilda Swinton* or Steve Buscemi alone would be enough to get me out of the kitchen and into a theatre.

And even if the presence of some of my favourite actors wasn’t enough, there’s also this: During the trailer, I heard a brief segment from a song, and it stopped me dead, so to speak. I immediately recognized it as “Seven and Seven Is”, by the 1960s band Love, creators of the achingly beautiful Forever Changes album. Love + Iggy Pop + Tom Waits — I’d see this one just for the soundtrack.

I’ve never been a huge fan of writer/director Jim Jarmusch, although I did like Only Lovers Left Alive, his lush 2013 vampire film with Tom Hiddleston, Anton Yelchin, and, of course, the divine Tilda. (Hmmm. First vampires, now zombies. Can a Jim Jarmusch werewolf movie be far away?)

The Dead Don’t Die is scheduled for a 14 June 2019 release.


*In a description of the movie for Esquire, Tyler Coates wrote that “Driver, Murray, and Sevigny play a trio of befuddled police officers who must prepare to do battle against the undead, while Swinton is an inexplicably Scottish and sword-wielding mortician who joins the cause.”

Inexplicably? Of course she plays a Scottish sword-wielding mortician. This is Tilda Swinton he’s writing about. What else would he expect?

Scenes from the Alice Waters Yard Sale

You Can Get Anything You Want at Alice’s Restaurant


 (Caroline Champlin/KQED)

(Caroline Champlin/KQED)

People started showing up outside Chez Panisse in Berkeley hours before the official 10 AM start of the Great Alice Waters 2019 Yard Sale last Sunday. By the time it began, the line stretched around the block.

Waters herself was on hand to sign books, posters, and old menus.

Photo: Nancy Rubin

Photo: Nancy Rubin

Photo: Nancy Rubin

Photo: Nancy Rubin

The opening of Chez Panisse in 1971 was one of the key events in the history of California Cuisine and the Great American Food Revolution. Almost 50 years later, the restaurant is still going strong.

 (Caroline Champlin/KQED)

(Caroline Champlin/KQED)

 (Caroline Champlin/KQED)

(Caroline Champlin/KQED)