Botticelli in Berlin

The Official Logo for the Show.   Warhol, of Course.

The Gemäldegalerie houses one of the world’s great collections of European paintings, despite suffering massive losses during and after WWII, when more than 400 large works were destroyed by a fire in a  bomb shelter, and hundreds of paintings were stolen by the members of the various victorious armies or confiscated by the Russian military and never returned.  It’s ironic that a war that was fought in part because of Germany’s belief in the superiority of its culture resulted in so many of the greatest real achievements of that culture being blasted into rubble or carted off to Russia.

Rich as the permanent collection is, with its masterpieces by Titian and Caravaggio, Raphael and Titian, Rubens and Rembrandt, the blockbuster exhibit at the Gemäldegalerie was an amazing show called Botticelli 2015 – 1445.

After his death in 1510, Sandro Botticelli was largely forgotten until his work was re-evaluated in the 19th Century.  Since then, his reputation has grown, and his  influence can be seen in the  works of countless artists.  The exhibition featured hundreds of pieces that echoed–sometimes obviously, other times not—the  art of Botticelli.

Here are some samples:

The Birth of Venus, Tomoko Nagao, 2014

The Birth of Venus, Tomoko Nagao, 2014

Birth of Venus, David LaChapelle, 2009

Birth of Venus, David LaChapelle, 2009

The Renaissance of Venus, Walter Crane, 1877

The Renaissance of Venus, Walter Crane, 1877

Botticelli Dress, Dolce & Gabbana

Botticelli Dress, Dolce & Gabbana, 2013

Venus, Yin Xin, 2008

Venus, Yin Xin, 2008

Warhol Again

Warhol Again

The show at the Gemäldegalerie runs through 24 January 2016.  It was only after I got home and reviewed the guide that I discovered that the exhibition is a collaboration between the Gemäldegalerie and the V&A.  A version of the show, retitled Botticelli Reimagined, will run at the V&A from 5 March 2016 through 3 July 2016.

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One thought on “Botticelli in Berlin

  1. Pingback: Berlin Miscellany (Part Two of Three) | More Songs about Buildings and Food

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